TMS Protocol May Be Effective in CRPS

Chronic Pain News, Therapies & Treatments
The use of a novel frequency pairing for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) may effectively relieve upper and lower extremity pain associated with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), according to a study published in Neuromodulation. The TMS protocol used in this study consisted of initial intermittent theta bursts (ie, burst of three 50-Hz pulses every 200 ms, 2 second-long trains repeated every 10 s, total of 600 pulses, delivered at 70% of the resting motor threshold [RMT]). This was followed by a 10-Hz stimulation (duration, 10 s; intertrain interval, 30 s; total pulses, 2000; delivered at 80% of RMT). Muscle activity was monitored throughout the stimulation. Study participants had a CRPS diagnosis according to the Budapest Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, a pain score >3 on the 0 to 10 numeric rating scale (NRS), and demonstrated…
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Dr. Castillo: The Opioid Crisis

Chronic Pain News
When you look at the “Opioid Epidemic” in America it is like an elephant everyone looks at it from their point of view and uses their facts the way they want the elephant viewed. The Federal Government passed a Law, as did the State of Arizona stating that the maximum level of opioids should be ninety morphine milligram equivalents (90MME). They based this more on politics and the storyline of opioid crisis with people dying. The facts are right, but is the interpretation correct. The opioid is killing people. The first thing is some people have severe pain. The Laws exempt cancer pain and dying patients. The reason, we don’t want people dying in pain. The fact is in numerous hospice patients we give doses of opioids and anxiety medications…
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Researchers ‘Hack’ Into the Brain’s Electrical Signals

Chronic Pain News
A team from University of Chicago figured out a new way to use light and nanotechnology to "hack" into brain function. For decades, neuroscientists and engineers have wanted to uncover the secrets of the human brain. Pop culture and science fiction films only serve to play into the understanding of the idea that the human brain can be 'hacked'. But one team of researchers might have actually gotten the world significantly closer to manipulating how our brain functions. Researchers from the University of Chicago used tiny, light-powered silicon wires to reshape how the brain responds. One day, the process could be used to treat brain disorders. The findings tap into the technique called optogenetics. The decade-old technique uses light to shape neural activity. However, the problem was that any optogenetic…
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Skin Cells may help repair MS damage

Chronic Pain News, Nerve Pain
A personalized treatment for multiple sclerosis may be one step closer, thanks to a new study that reveals how a person's own skin cells could be used to repair the nerve damage that the disease causes. Led by scientists at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, the study took skin cells from adult mice with multiple sclerosis (MS) and then reprogramed them into neural stem cells (NSCs). These "induced neural stem cells" (iNSCs) were transplanted into the rodents' cerebrospinal fluid. There, they reduced inflammation and repaired damage to the central nervous system (CNS). Lead study author Dr. Stefano Pluchino, of the Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge, and team believe that their strategy could offer a promising treatment for MS and other neurological diseases. The researchers recently reported their findings in the journal Cell Stem Cell.…
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The Pain Effect and the Body’s Response

Chronic Pain Conditions, Chronic Pain News, Nerve Pain
Pain sends a signal that the body needs protection and healing. However, if the physiological changes triggered by it persists, harm will ensue, and acute pain may become chronic, so pain must be contained and/or relieved. The mechanisms through which pain interacts with the body provide health professionals with various routes of entry and modes of intervention. This article discusses the intricacies of the adaptive response to pain and how they can be used to combat it. Citation: Swift A (2018) Understanding pain and the human body’s response to it. Nursing Times[online]; 114: 3, 22-26 Author: Amelia Swift is senior lecturer in nursing, University of Birmingham. She has updated a 2003 article, Understanding the physiological effects of unrelieved pain, written by Carolyn Middleton, clinical nurse specialist at Gwent Healthcare Trust. Introduction Pain, which…
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Muscle Stem Cells could Address Circulation Problems

Chronic Pain Conditions, Chronic Pain News, Nerve Pain
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Stem cells taken from muscle tissue could promote better blood flow in patients with diabetes who develop peripheral artery disease, a painful complication that can require surgery or lead to amputation. A new study in mice at the University of Illinois found that an injection of the stem cells prompted new blood vessels to grow, improving circulation in the affected tissues and function in the affected limbs. The stem cells also induced changes in gene expression in the surrounding tissues, prompting the release of factors to reduce inflammation and increase circulation. The study was published in the journal Theranostics. "PAD is very common in diabetic patients, but it is difficult to diagnose because patients experience symptoms when the disease is already at an advanced state," said study leader…
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Healing molecule discovery could reduce limb amputations

Chronic Pain News, Nerve Pain
Scientists have discovered new insights into a molecule which is part of the body's tissue repair system, in a finding which could help treat non-healing wounds and injuries, such as diabetic foot body's tissue repair system, in a finding which could help treat non-healing wounds and injuries, such as diabetic foot. The number of limbs amputated because of diabetes is at an all-time high of 20 each day in England alone. Intense research around the world is being carried out to discover new treatments that could help avoid such life-changing operations and reduce medical costs for society. A study led by the universities of Exeter and Bath, and published in the journal Antioxidants and Redox Signalling has made great strides in understanding how the molecule deoxyribose-1-phosphate stimulates the formation of new blood…
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Nerve cell therapy restores motor function

Chronic Pain News, Nerve Pain, Therapies & Treatments
Regenerative therapy using millions of nerve cells, derived from human embryonic stem cells, restored two or more motor levels on at least one side, in four out of six patients with paralyzing spinal cord injuries, according to researchers at the Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. In a press release, the medical center reported the 67% recovery rate is “more than double” the rates previously reported in matched historical controls and in published data in a similar population — patients who had lost all motor function below the location of their spinal injury. “Having worked on this research for more than 20 years, and given that we hadn’t seen any significant improvement before, these results are beyond anything I would have hoped for in the study,” researcher Richard G. Fessler, MD,…
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Multivitamins May Reduce CIPN

Chronic Pain Conditions, Chronic Pain News, Nerve Pain
Women who take multivitamin supplements before their breast cancer diagnosis and during chemotherapy appear to be less likely to develop the debilitating, often long-lasting symptoms of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), according to a new study.   In a large study of breast cancer patients undergoing paclitaxel chemotherapy, those who used multivitamins were about 40% less likely to suffer sensory loss. The researchers published their results online ahead of print in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. “Our study showed that use of multivitamin supplements, but not specific vitamins, was associated with less neurotoxicity. This was true for use before diagnosis and, to a lesser extent, during chemotherapy,” said senior author Christine Ambrosone, PhD, of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York. CIPN symptoms often persist after completion of chemotherapy, and…
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Shingles Pain Cause Discovered

Chronic Pain Conditions, Chronic Pain News, Nerve Pain
It is very likely that when you were a child, you had chickenpox, a mostly benign condition that despite making you extremely itchy, required you to miss a week or two of school. While most parents would think their children are safe from the infection after its resolved, what they don’t realize is that it may show up later in life in a painful form called shingles. A constant feature of shingles is neuralgia—intense pain affecting mainly the nerves of the chest and neck, the trigeminal nerve in the fact, and the lower back. New research out of the University of São Paulo (USP) has discovered why shingles patients feel pain, which lays the foundation for treating the condition. The same childhood virus Shingles occur due to the exact same virus that…
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