Regenerative Bandage Accelerates Wound Healing

Chronic Pain News, Regenerative medicine
[caption id="" align="alignright" width="508"] The regenerative bandage promotes cell spreading and proliferation. The green spots are live cells entrapped in the hydrogel and stained with Calcein-AM. Credit: Ameer Research Lab, Northwestern University[/caption] A simple scrape or sore might not cause alarm for most people. But for diabetic patients, an untreated scratch can turn into an open wound that could potentially lead to a limb amputation or even death. A Northwestern University team has developed a new device, called a regenerative bandage, that quickly heals these painful, hard-to-treat sores without using drugs. During head-to-head tests, Northwestern's bandage healed diabetic wounds 33 percent faster than one of the most popular bandages currently on the market. "The novelty is that we identified a segment of a protein in skin that is important to…
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Regenerative Medicine the Pain Management Alternative

Nerve Pain, Regenerative medicine, Therapies & Treatments
Injuries happen to almost everyone, but for some they can be far worse. For those with chronic pain, arthritis and a host of other ailments, it can mean a lifetime of discomfort. While many of those symptoms can be treated, it’s often with invasive surgery or only partially effective treatments like cortisone shots. Regenerative medicine offers an alternative to going under the knife, while achieving lasting results. Relievus, a pain management and neurology specialist practice, offers these treatments at both its Havertown and Philadelphia locations. Here, clinician Dr. Uplekh Purewal offers insight. Q: What is regenerative medicine? A: It’s a form of medicine that involves using the regenerative properties of the human body to help repair injuries or chronic, pathological conditions like arthritis over a period of time. We’re harvesting the…
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Regenerative Stem Cell Therapy for Knees & Shoulders

Regenerative medicine, Therapies & Treatments
The power of the body to heal itself is amazingly evident in a promising newer treatment known as regenerative stem cell therapy, which orthopedic surgeon Kevin D. Plancher, MD, founder of Plancher Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, is tapping more frequently to help restore pain-free movement in patients with stubborn knee or shoulder problems. Part of a branch of healthcare known as regenerative medicine, stem cell therapy uses immature, self-renewing cells found in the bone marrow to rejuvenate a wide variety of tissues. This rapidly evolving field, the focus of mounting research, is helping people heal faster and more naturally as well as avoid surgery and other more invasive treatments, says Dr. Plancher, who founded the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Plancher Orthopedics and completed one of his two fellowships at…
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Manufactured Stem Cells Might Boost New Diabetes Therapies

Chronic Pain Conditions, Regenerative medicine, Therapies & Treatments
Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated from adult cells. Because iPSCs have the potential to develop into any cell type in the human body, they hold an enormous therapeutic potential in a variety of conditions, including cardiac diseases, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s disease, spinal cord injury, and diabetes. A team of researchers from Lonza in Walkersville, Maryland, developed clinical-grade iPSCs (iPSCs that are safe for patients) from human umbilical cord blood cells collected following a healthy birth. These cells, described in the study “cGMP-Manufactured Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Are Available for Pre-Clinical and Clinical Applications,” published in Stem Cell Reports, are now available for order, which will facilitate clinical research on iPSCs. Clinical-grade stem cells are different from the more common laboratory-grade cells, which are used in most scientific animal- or cell culture-based studies, because they are…
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Stem Cells for Personalized Pain Therapy Testing

Chronic Pain News, Regenerative medicine
Using patient-derived stem cells, researchers create laboratory neuron models that reflect a patient’s response to a pain drug. Pain can be tough to take, and it’s also difficult to study: rodent models for pain do not necessarily translate to human pain conditions and expression of disease-causing mutations in cell lines may not precisely mimic the physiology of human pain disorders. Now, researchers have developed a new way to test pain—and, potentially, other sensory-targeting medications. Edward Stevens and James Bilsland of the Pfizer’s U.K.-based neuroscience and pain research units and their colleagues have shown that induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from blood samples of patients with a pain disorder can be used to create sensory neurons that recapitulate the disease phenotype. Testing a novel pain inhibitor on the patient-derived, iPSC-based…
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